Who owns the land? Territorial ownership understandings and intergroup relations in a settler society

Wybren Nooitgedagt, Borja Martinović, Maykel Verkuyten*, Kumar Yogeeswaran

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Conflicts over the ownership of territory have shaped intergroup relations between indigenous and nonindigenous groups in settler societies. Using latent profile analysis, we found four different subgroups of individuals among a sample of European New Zealanders based on their perceived ingroup (NZ European) and outgroup (Māori) ownership. Most people (75.9%) perceived shared territorial ownership, but there were also individuals predominantly recognizing ingroup ownership (8.2%), outgroup ownership (6.4%), or no territorial ownership (9.4%). These subgroups differed in meaningful ways in their support for principles of ownership, perceived rights and responsibilities, compensation for Māori, and support for strict immigration policies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-354
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2023

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