Using Biomass Gasification Mineral Residue as Catalyst to Produce Light Olefins from CO, CO2, and H2 Mixtures

Iris C Ten Have, Robin Y van den Brink, Stéphane C Marie-Rose, Florian Meirer, Bert Marc Weckhuysen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Gasification is a process to transform solids, such as agricultural and municipal waste, into gaseous feedstock for making transportation fuels. The so-called coarse solid residue (CSR) that remains after this conversion process is currently discarded as a process solid residue. In the context of transitioning from a linear to a circular society, the feasibility of using the solid process residue from waste gasification as a solid catalyst for light olefin production from CO, CO2, and H2 mixtures was investigated. This CSR-derived catalyst converted biomass-derived syngas, a H2-poor mixture of CO, CO2, H2, and N2, into methane (57 %) and C2–C4 olefins (43 %) at 450 °C and 20 bar. The main active ingredient of CSR was Fe, and it was discovered with operando X-ray diffraction that metallic Fe, present after pre-reduction in H2, transformed into an Fe carbide phase under reaction conditions. The increased formation of Fe carbides correlated with an increase in CO conversion and olefin selectivity. The presence of alkali elements, such as Na and K, in CSR-derived catalyst increased olefin production as well.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere202200436
Pages (from-to)1-10
JournalChemSusChem
Volume15
Issue number11
Early online date16 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jun 2022

Keywords

  • CO hydrogenation
  • Fischer–Tropsch
  • biomass residue
  • iron
  • olefins

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