The role of expectancies in accepting task-related diversity: do disappointment and lack of commitment stem from actual differences or violated expectations?

Floor Rink, Naomi Ellemers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Two studies show that initial expectancies influence the way people respond toward task-related differences (i.e., in work goals or work styles) between the self and a collaboration partner. When no advance information is available, participants expect their partner to be similar to themselves in task-related aspects. However, when people expect their partner to have a different work goal (Study 1) or work style (Study 2), and this actually is the case, disappointment is reduced and commitment toward future collaboration is increased. Initial expectations are important because these help people develop a clear picture of their partner. When initial expectations are violated, people conceive the other less clearly and this is part of the reason they report lower levels of commitment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)842-54
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Choice Behavior
  • Cooperative Behavior
  • Decision Making
  • Goals
  • Humans
  • Individuality
  • Internal-External Control
  • Interpersonal Relations
  • Motivation
  • Set, Psychology
  • commitment
  • clarity
  • task-related diversity
  • expectancies
  • expectancy violation
  • disappointment

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