Text structure instruction in primary education: Effects on reading, summarization, and writing

S. T. M. Bogaerds-Hazenberg*, J. Evers-Vermeul, H. van den Bergh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Although knowledge of informational text structures can promote text comprehension, this topic receives little attention in the Dutch primary school curriculum. 201 Dutch students in grades 4-6 participated with their teachers (n = 10) in this quasi-experimental study with a switching-panels replication design. Students either first followed a text structure intervention (TOP) and then went back to business-as-usual, or the other way around. During the intervention, teachers taught their students about the characteristics of four informational text structures, and how to use structure-specific graphic organizers to organize main ideas for each structure. In addition, several writing tasks related to the different text structures were included. At three measurement occasions, students completed text structure tests, reading comprehension tests, summarization tasks, and writing tasks. Only the fourth graders in one iteration of the intervention showed immediate effects over and above the effect of business-as-usual lessons on the text structure test (d = 0.50), the reading comprehension test (d = 0.53), the summarization task (d = 0.48). In both iterations of the intervention, an immediate effect was found on writing (d = 0.33 and d = 0.39). These findings are discussed in the light of test-related issues and implementation fidelity data.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-59
Number of pages30
JournalPedagogische Studiën
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2024

Keywords

  • implementation fidelity
  • primary education
  • reading comprehension
  • text structure instruction

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