Prolonged Grief, Posttraumatic Stress, Anger, and Revenge Phenomena Following Homicidal Loss: The Role of Negative Cognitions and Avoidance Behaviors

Paul A. Boelen*, Mariette van Denderen, Jos de Keijser

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study examined associations of symptoms of Prolonged Grief Disorder (PGD), Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), anger, and revenge thoughts and feelings with different categories of negative cognitions and indices of anxious and depressive avoidance behaviors, among 331 homicidally bereaved individuals. Outcomes showed that symptom levels of PGD and PTSD were higher among individuals who had more negative cognitions about the self, were more inclined to catastrophically misinterpret their grief reactions, and tended to engage in depressive avoidance. Anger was strongly associated with negative cognitions about the self. Revenge thoughts and feelings were associated with pessimistic cognitions and anxious avoidance of loss-related stimuli.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-195
Number of pages19
JournalHomicide Studies
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

Keywords

  • avoidance
  • bereavement
  • cognitions
  • homicide

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