Normative, expressive, and personal factors associated with cooperation with police: Findings from a longitudinal cohort study

Amy Nivette*, Idris Güçlü, Denis Ribeaud, Manuel Eisner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: While there has been extensive research on the normative, instrumental, and social explanations for cooperation with police, fewer studies have examined how personal, social-cognitive characteristics might influence willingness to cooperate. This paper integrates models of cooperation with the social information processing framework to understand when individuals are more willing to cooperate with the police. Methods: We use two waves of data from the Zurich Project on Social Development from Childhood to Adulthood, an ongoing longitudinal study of an ethnically diverse sample of young people from Zurich, Switzerland. Results: The results show that, aside from perceptions of police legitimacy, moral neutralization and empathy were directly associated with willingness to cooperate. Police legitimacy moderated the relationship between moral neutralization and cooperation, however this effect was not robust across models. In addition, we found that those who have engaged in serious criminal behavior were less likely to cooperate. Conclusions: We argue that our findings demonstrate the need for cooperation with police research to adopt a decision-making framework in explaining the decision to indirectly intervene and cooperate. Namely, individuals must first recognize and acknowledge the harm or illegal behavior done when deciding to take action to cooperate with the police.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102213
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume93
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2024

Keywords

  • Cooperation
  • Empathy
  • Moral neutralization
  • Police legitimacy
  • Self-efficacy
  • Social information processing

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Normative, expressive, and personal factors associated with cooperation with police: Findings from a longitudinal cohort study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this