Multivariate analysis of electron detachment dissociation and infrared multiphoton dissociation mass spectra of heparan sulfate tetrasaccharides differing only in hexuronic acid stereochemistry

Han Bin Oh, Franklin E Leach, Sailaja Arungundram, Kanar Al-Mafraji, Andre Venot, Geert-Jan Boons, I Jonathan Amster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The structural characterization of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) carbohydrates by mass spectrometry has been a long-standing analytical challenge due to the inherent heterogeneity of these biomolecules, specifically polydispersity, variability in sulfation, and hexuronic acid stereochemistry. Recent advances in tandem mass spectrometry methods employing threshold and electron-based ion activation have resulted in the ability to determine the location of the labile sulfate modification as well as assign the stereochemistry of hexuronic acid residues. To facilitate the analysis of complex electron detachment dissociation (EDD) spectra, principal component analysis (PCA) is employed to differentiate the hexuronic acid stereochemistry of four synthetic GAG epimers whose EDD spectra are nearly identical upon visual inspection. For comparison, PCA is also applied to infrared multiphoton dissociation spectra (IRMPD) of the examined epimers. To assess the applicability of multivariate methods in GAG mixture analysis, PCA is utilized to identify the relative content of two epimers in a binary mixture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)582-90
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Heparitin Sulfate
  • Hexuronic Acids
  • Mass Spectrometry
  • Multivariate Analysis
  • Principal Component Analysis
  • Stereoisomerism

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