Multiple categories of non-cardiac QT-prolonging drugs are associated with increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: real-world data from a population-based study

Talip E Eroglu, Marieke T Blom, Patrick C Souverein, Anthonius de Boer, Hanno L Tan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

AIM: Drugs causing QT-prolongation as off-target effect [non-cardiac QT-prolonging drugs (QT-drugs)] increase the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Such drugs are categorized in multiple clinically widely used CredibleMeds.org lists. Category 1 ('known risk of Torsade de Pointes') and category 2 ('possible risk of Torsade de Pointes') are of particular clinical relevance. However, a category-stratified analysis of OHCA-risk is presently unavailable.

METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a case-control study with OHCA-cases from presumed cardiac causes included from the ARREST registry in the Netherlands (2009-2018) that was specifically designed to study OHCA, and age/sex/OHCA-date matched non-OHCA-controls. Adjusted odds ratios for OHCA (ORadj) of QT-drugs from categories 1 or 2 were calculated, using conditional logistic regression. Stratified analysis was performed according to sex, age, and presence of cardiovascular drugs (proxy for cardiovascular disease). We included 5473 OHCA-cases (68.8 years, 69.9% men) and matched them to 20 866 non-OHCA-controls. Compared with no use of non-cardiac QT-drugs, drugs of both categories were associated with increased OHCA-risk, but seemingly weaker for category 2 {category 1: case 3.2%, control 1.4%, ORadj 1.7 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-2.1]}; [category 2: case 7.3%, control 4.0%, ORadj 1.4 (95% CI: 1.2-1.6)]. The increased risk occurred in men and women, at all ages (highest in patients aged ≤50 years), and both in the presence or absence of cardiovascular drug use.

CONCLUSION: Both category 1 and category 2 QT-drugs are associated with increased OHCA-risk in both sexes, at all ages, and in patients taking or not taking cardiovascular drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)630–638
JournalEuropace
Volume24
Issue number4
Early online date18 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

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