Is multimodality advantageous? Assessing the relationship between multimodality and perceived transport adequacy and accessibility in different travel contexts

Xingxing Fu*, Dea van Lierop, Dick Ettema

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Multimodality is regarded as essential to promoting sustainable mobility because of the widely found environmental benefits, although it is unclear whether individuals experience multimodality as a benefit or a burden. This study aims to investigate the relationship between multimodality and perceived transport adequacy and accessibility in different travel contexts. Using data collected in two large Dutch cities, we realized the research aim from three perspectives. First, a multigroup multimodality index was constructed to measure the variability of transport mode use at both major-category and sub-category levels, which somehow addressed the mode classification issue in measuring multimodality. Second, by performing a regression analysis on the factors associated with multimodality, we found that multimodality occurs in different travel contexts related to certain conditions or constraints. Third, the effects of multimodality as well as the interaction effects of car-related factors and multimodality on two factors of perceived transport adequacy and perceived accessibility are assessed using stepwise regression models. Results show that multimodality is burdensome, especially for those who rely on cars. Specifically, being more multimodal is generally associated with higher perceived disadvantage and lower perceived accessibility; for people who experience the ease of driving or have limited access to a car, being more multimodal results in even lower perceived achievement or perceived accessibility. The results indicate that even in compact and less car-dependent urban settings, multimodality lacks attraction and reducing car use is difficult. The findings inform multimodal transport policies and planning to balance social and environmental values by assessing and minimizing the negative individual externalities.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103893
JournalTransportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice
Volume179
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Accessibility
  • Car dependence
  • Multimodal transport
  • Multimodality
  • Transport adequacy

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