Intensity- and domain-specific levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior in 10- to 14-year-old children

Stijn De Baere, Jan Seghers, Renaat Philippaerts, Kristine De Martelaer, Johan Lefevre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: to investigate levels of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) in 10- to 14-year-olds and to determine PA differences between week-weekend days, genders and school stages. Methods: 241 children were recruited from 15 primary and 15 secondary schools. PA was assessed for 7 days using the SenseWear Mini Armband and an electronic diary. Week-weekend and gender differences were determined using 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Combined intensity- and domain-specific PA differences between genders and school stages were examined using 2-way ANOVA. Results: Weekdays were more active compared with weekend days. Physical activity level (PAL) of boys was higher compared with girls. Boys showed more moderate (+15 min/day) and vigorous PA (+9 min/day), no differences were found for SB and light PA. Secondary school children showed more SB (+111 min/day), moderate (+8 min/day) and vigorous (+9 min/day) PA and less light PA (-66 min/day) compared with primary school children. No difference was found for PAL. The results of the combined intensity- and domain-specific parameters revealed more nuanced differences between genders and school stages. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the complexity of PA and SB behavior of children, indicating the need for a multidimensional and differentiated approach in PA promotion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1543-1550
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Physical Activity & Health
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2015

Keywords

  • Electronic activity diary
  • Gender differences
  • School transition
  • SenseWear Mini Armband

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