Exploring the 3D printing of molybdenum carbide-based catalysts for the reverse water gas shift reaction: A multi scale study

Arturo Pajares*, Jacob Andrade-Arvizu, Disha Jain, Matteo Monai*, Jasper Lefevere, Pilar Ramírez de la Piscina, Narcís Homs, Bart Michielsen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

A new methodology for preparing 3D printing molybdenum carbide-based catalysts with direct ink writing is presented. CO2 conversion experiments through the reverse water gas shift reaction showed that the catalytic behavior of 3D-MoxC/Al2O3 catalysts is controlled by the crystallite size and crystalline phase, which in turn were dependent on the Mo loading. The formation of cubic δ-MoC and hexagonal η-Mo3C2 was prevalent in small crystallite sizes at low loading of Mo, and α/β-Mo2C in larger crystallite sizes at high loading of Mo. Operando DRIFTS experiments points out that hydroxyl species present on the surface of Al2O3 play a major role in bicarbonate formation that leads to the formation of formates, which eventually decomposes to CO and H2O. The produced structures were mechanically stable and kept their structural and textural properties after reaction. Therefore, this work introduces new perspectives for scaling-up 3D printed structures based on molybdenum carbide.

Original languageEnglish
Article number149048
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalChemical Engineering Journal
Volume482
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 2024

Keywords

  • 3D-printed catalysts
  • CO conversion
  • Molybdenum carbide
  • RWGS
  • Transition metal carbides

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