Cross-country user connections in an online social network for music: 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems

Christine Bauer, Markus Schedl

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperAcademic

Abstract

Social connections and cultural aspects play important roles in shaping an individual's preferences. For instance, people tend to select friends with similar music preferences. Furthermore, preferences and friending are influenced by cultural aspects. Recommender systems may benefit from these phenomena by using knowledge about the nature of social ties to better tailor recommendations to an individual. Focusing on the specifities of music preferences, we study user connections on Last.fm---an online social network for music. We identify those countries whose users are mainly connected within the same country, and those countries that are characterized by cross-country user connections. Strong cross-country connection pairs are typically characterized by similar cultural, historic, or linguistic backgrounds, or geographic proximity. The United States, the United Kingdom, and Russia are identified as countries having a large relative amount of user connections from other countries. Our results contribute to understanding the complexity of social ties and how they are reflected in connection behavior, and are a promising source for advancements of personalized systems.
Original languageEnglish
PagesLBW0112:1-LBW0112:6
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Event2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 4 May 20199 May 2019

Conference

Conference2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Abbreviated titleCHI 2019
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period4/05/199/05/19

Keywords

  • cross-country user connections; friends; online social networks; social ties

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